Another new reserve in New South Wales

Tuesday 18 December, 2007
A map showing the location of our new 'Nameless' reserve in NSW.A map showing the location of our new 'Nameless' reserve in NSW.

A generous gift of land has given Bush Heritage a new reserve in New South Wales. Supporter Louise Sylvan donated her 55 hectare property ‘Nameless’ and, at her request, it will be known as the Bush Heritage ‘Nameless’ Sylvan Reserve.

The title ‘Nameless’ was chosen by Louise Sylvan’s late husband Richard, whose foresight first secured the land for conservation. ‘The ambiguity [of the name] would please him,’ Louise said. We are very grateful to Louise for this far-sighted and generous gift.

The property is situated on the steep slopes of the Illawarra Escarpment approximately 10km north of Berry and close to Barren Grounds Nature Reserve.

Long-nosed potoroo. Photo Jiri Lochman / Lochman Transparencies.Long-nosed potoroo. Photo Jiri Lochman / Lochman Transparencies.

It protects one of the few remnants of endangered Illawarra subtropical rainforest. At the higher elevations there are species from the cool temperate and warm temperate rainforest, while on the lower slopes and along the creek lines the warm temperate and subtropical species dominate.

These species include the giant stinging tree Dendrocnide excels, red cedar Toona ciliata, various figs Ficus spp. and the brush bloodwood Baloghia inophylla.

The fast-flowing, vibrant Irwin’s Creek flows through the reserve and on the day that our assessment team visited the property there were platypus and native water rats frolicking around the pools, dragon flies everywhere and freshwater crayfish scurrying under the rocks. The water quality is excellent.

Sugar glider. Photo Jiri Lochman / Lochman Transparencies.Long-nosed potoroo. Photo Jiri Lochman / Lochman Transparencies.

‘Nameless’ Sylvan Reserve is also very significant for a range of threatened and endangered species. Animal and plant surveys have yet to be undertaken but likely species include the endangered tiger quoll, vulnerable long-nosed potoroo, common bent-wing bat, eastern pygmy possum and mountain brushtail, and the greater glider, sugar glider, feathertail glider, yellow-bellied glider and powerful owl.

Our main management issues will be to control weeds such as lantana, wild tobacco tree and coral tree, and to manage feral pigs, foxes, goats and cats. New fences will be needed to keep out the neighbourhood cattle that currently have unrestricted access to the lower areas of the property.

This is a very special place and we are delighted that it has become a Bush Heritage reserve.