Working Together for Conservation on Country

Saturday 20 March, 2010

Warddeken traditional lands are now an Indigenous Protected Area

Warddeken, Djelk and Wanga Djakamirr rangers and other stakeholders gathered to discuss strategic regional weed management.Warddeken, Djelk and Wanga Djakamirr rangers and other stakeholders gathered to discuss strategic regional weed management. Photo Lyndall McLean.

As part of our Conservation on Country program, Bush Heritage works in partnership with the Warddeken people of the West Arnhem Plateau, which borders Kakadu National Park in the Northern Territory.

The partnership started three years ago when Bush Heritage, along with WWF-Australia, provided support to produce a conservation management plan – a vital part of the process for declaring an Indigenous Protected Area (IPA).

IPA status provides a way for Warddeken people to protect their traditional country and conserve high-value conservation lands as part of the National Reserve System.

Fire workshop at KabulwarnamyoFire workshop at Kabulwarnamyo. Photo Lyndall McLean.

It also provides ongoing funding for land management employment opportunities which delivers tangible improvements in the health and wellbeing of Indigenous communities.

However, additional funding and resources are required to enable Warddeken people to leverage other opportunities to care for their country and communities.

Bush Heritage has supported the development of effective, sustainable governance mechanisms for the management of both Warddeken IPA and the adjacent Djelk IPA, as well as the establishment of a legal framework and endowment fund so supporters can help to finance future conservation actions.

This project was made possible by the generous support of donors including WWF and The Nature Conservancy.

For more on this story, click through to the Autumn 2010 issue of Bush Heritage News.

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