Visit Chereninup Creek (WA)

Last updated: Thursday 12 May, 2016

No camping, no pets, no firearms

A freshwater pool on Chereninup Creek Reserve. Chinch Gryniewicz.
A freshwater pool on Chereninup Creek Reserve. Chinch Gryniewicz.
Area: 898 hectares
Purchased: in 2002 with the help of Bush Heritage supporters.

Location

In the south-west corner of Western Australia, in the traditional lands of the Noongar people, between Fitzgerald River and Stirling Range National Parks.

Conservation value 

Chereninup is in one of the world’s most biologically valuable ecoregions, and plays a key role in the Gondwana Link habitat restoration project.

Morning light on leaves of Tallerack. Photo Barbara Madden.
Morning light on leaves of Tallerack. Photo Barbara Madden.
The reserve protects flat-topped yate woodland, mallet and moort woodland, wallabies and freshwater systems. Chereninup also provides sanctuary for threatened species including the dwarf spider orchid, malleefowl and Carnaby’s black cockatoo.

When to go 

Chereninup is open to the public for day visits. April to October is the best time to visit when temperatures are cooler. This includes the wildflower season, occurring anytime from August to October. Avoid summer months as it's hot and dry, with a high risk of wild fires.

Chereninup has good habitat for Honey Possums. Photo Annette Ruzicka.
Chereninup has good habitat for Honey Possums. Photo Annette Ruzicka.
Facilities

There are no facilities on Chereninup.

Preparation

Your safety is our concern but your responsibility. Please prepare thoroughly as the reserve is some distance from medical and emergency services.

In an emergency, call 000. Ensure you have adequate food, water, first aid supplies and appropriate communication equipment. (Note: the creek water on the reserve is salty.)

Check weather conditions and please don't travel to the property if weather conditions are unfavourable, as Chereninup is in a high fire risk area.

SPECIAL REQUEST: Help minimise the chance of introducing the root fungus Phytophthora cinnamomi, by ensuring footwear, clothing, vehicles and other gear is free from soil before entering the property. Once established, Phytophthora cinnamomi is impossible to eradicate and causes the death of many species.

Also, please consider whether you're confident at finding your way around the bush, as there are no marked walking tracks.

How to get there

Chereninup is about 470km (5 hours' drive) by road south-east of Perth and 155 km (2 hours' drive) north-east of Albany.

The reserve is to the west of Carney Road. Look out for the Chereninup Creek reserve sign, park your vehicle in the vicinity of the dam or shelter just inside the gate, and explore on foot from there. Refer to map following.

Larger map

While on the reserve

Malaleuca diosmifolia. Photo Barbara Madden.
Malaleuca diosmifolia. Photo Barbara Madden.
Do not disturb or remove plants, animals, or historical and cultural items and areas. Before you leave, please check you’ve taken all your rubbish with you.

What to see

Chereninup Creek runs through the reserve, along with several pools within granite rock. If you walk quietly, you might be rewarded with a sighting of the Western Whipbird, Southern Scrub-robin, Carnaby’s Black Cockatoo, Regent Parrot or Malleefowl.

Tammar and Brush Wallabies often graze in the revegetated area at the entrance to the property in the early morning and late afternoon.

Aboriginal connections

Proteaceous Sand Heath in sunset light. Photo Chinch Gryniewicz.
Proteaceous Sand Heath in sunset light. Photo Chinch Gryniewicz.
Chereninup is the traditional land of the Noongar people, and hosts numerous artefact scatters, lizard traps, campsites, bushtucker and medicines. Noongar elders have requested that the locations of these important areas not be publicised to help protect them.

Conservation work

At Bush Heritage, we not only purchase ecologically important land, but also work continuously to restore fragile ecosystems. In 2003, as part of the Gondwana Link project, we took on what was the largest restoration project ever carried out in Australia, regenerating 60 hectares of previously cleared bushland with the eucalypts, melaleucas, wattles and she -oak that characterise the surrounding bush.

A typical scene at Chereninup Creek. Photo Phil Cullen.
A typical scene at Chereninup Creek. Photo Phil Cullen.
Just three years after planting began, honey possums, were already using the restored habitat, along with black-gloved and tammar wallabies.

Thank you

Thank you to all our supporters, whose donations fund the day-to-day cost of managing this reserve. And to the many dedicated people involved in our work including volunteers, partners and contractors.

How you can help

Supporting Bush Heritage Australia is an excellent choice for those who love the bush and want to protect it for future generations. Help us preserve our remaining tracts of native vegetation and maintain crucial habitat for endangered species.

Donations to Bush Heritage are tax deductible and contribute towards the protection of our unique and natural heritage.

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