A boom year at Cravens Peak

Jane Blackwood
Published 15 May 2019 
about  Cravens Peak Reserve  
Perhaps we should rename Homestead Paddock to Swan Lake! Photo by Jane Blackwood<br/> Perhaps we should rename Homestead Paddock to Swan Lake! Photo by Jane Blackwood
Milelong Billabong on the Mulligan River.<br/> Milelong Billabong on the Mulligan River.
Sudells Frog (Neobatrachus sudelli) on Plum Pudding Road.<br/> Sudells Frog (Neobatrachus sudelli) on Plum Pudding Road.
It's a big nesting year for Banded Lapwings. There are at least 2 pairs around the homestead.<br/> It's a big nesting year for Banded Lapwings. There are at least 2 pairs around the homestead.

Cravens Peak Reserve has received 225 mm of rain this year in two extraordinary rain events, and the desert's plants and animals are loving it.

Cyclone Trevor crossed from the Gulf of Carpentaria into the Northern Territory and caused a rain depression to swing east and to download over western Queensland.

Cravens Peak received 120 mm in late March!

This rain put all the catchments of the Georgina, Mulligan and Bourke rivers into flood. Then in early May we received a further 80 mm from a large trough system with embedded storms along the edge. This took green and lush to a new scale on Cravens as everything received that follow up rain.

All the ephemeral wetlands are full. The ground is thoroughly soaked, all the spinifex and grasses have ripe seedheads, swamp plants are abundant and the vast Gibber plains are verdant green. Underground frogs emerged. Lots of plants are in full bloom, including a variety of Acacias. And there are many nesting birds.

2019 is shaping up as a wonderful year on the desert edge of Queensland.

Perhaps we should rename Homestead Paddock to Swan Lake! Photo by Jane Blackwood<br/> Perhaps we should rename Homestead Paddock to Swan Lake! Photo by Jane Blackwood
Milelong Billabong on the Mulligan River.<br/> Milelong Billabong on the Mulligan River.
Sudells Frog (Neobatrachus sudelli) on Plum Pudding Road.<br/> Sudells Frog (Neobatrachus sudelli) on Plum Pudding Road.
It's a big nesting year for Banded Lapwings. There are at least 2 pairs around the homestead.<br/> It's a big nesting year for Banded Lapwings. There are at least 2 pairs around the homestead.