A world of colour

about  Monjebup Reserves  
on 21 Sep 2017 
It makes sense that malleefowl are using this habitat.  The Acacias that are so useful in kickstarting the restoration don’t provide any nectar for the nectar-feeders, but their seeds are rich in protein and are a favourite food for malleefowl. <br/>Good tucker! It makes sense that malleefowl are using this habitat. The Acacias that are so useful in kickstarting the restoration don’t provide any nectar for the nectar-feeders, but their seeds are rich in protein and are a favourite food for malleefowl.
Good tucker!
<br/>New malleefowl nest currently under construction in the 2012 restoration area at Monjebup North.
New malleefowl nest currently under construction in the 2012 restoration area at Monjebup North.
Shot taken a year after the 2014 direct-seeding.<br/> Shot taken a year after the 2014 direct-seeding.
<br/>The same shot taken yesterday, showing development three years after direct-seeding.
The same shot taken yesterday, showing development three years after direct-seeding.
Restored vegetation in the 2012 area, in a system with significant component of Allocasuarina/she-oak.  Acacias are dropping out, and a hand-planted ‘proteaceous node’ of white-flowered Hakea nitida in the background is well established.<br/> Restored vegetation in the 2012 area, in a system with significant component of Allocasuarina/she-oak. Acacias are dropping out, and a hand-planted ‘proteaceous node’ of white-flowered Hakea nitida in the background is well established.
Hakea nitida, like most of the Hakeas, produces so much nectar that its aroma hangs heavy in the air on warm spring afternoons.<br/> Hakea nitida, like most of the Hakeas, produces so much nectar that its aroma hangs heavy in the air on warm spring afternoons.
Acacias still doing their job in the 2013 restoration area.  As well as the ‘proteaceous nodes’ hand-planted here, some proteaceous species including Hakea corymbosa were included in the direct-seeding and are well represented in this system.<br/> Acacias still doing their job in the 2013 restoration area. As well as the ‘proteaceous nodes’ hand-planted here, some proteaceous species including Hakea corymbosa were included in the direct-seeding and are well represented in this system.
As well as producing copious quantities of nectar, the seriously spiky Hakea corymbosa makes for ideal predator-proofed nesting sites for Tawny-Crowned Honeyeaters and other small birds.<br/> As well as producing copious quantities of nectar, the seriously spiky Hakea corymbosa makes for ideal predator-proofed nesting sites for Tawny-Crowned Honeyeaters and other small birds.
Developing habitat in the 2013 restoration area.  What self-respecting Honey Possum, Emu Wren or Malleefowl wouldn’t want to live here?<br/> Developing habitat in the 2013 restoration area. What self-respecting Honey Possum, Emu Wren or Malleefowl wouldn’t want to live here?
It’ll be interesting to see what fauna turns up the next time our pitfall trapping sites are run.<br/> It’ll be interesting to see what fauna turns up the next time our pitfall trapping sites are run.
If at first you don’t succeed, try again. Direct-seeding failed in sticky grey clays in a ‘hole’ in the 2014 restoration area. The change in soil type couldn’t be clearer!<br/>But seedlings of the striking Red Moort Eucalyptus vesiculosa planted into it later couldn’t be happier, and the area will develop as a gorgeous Red Moort woodland. If at first you don’t succeed, try again. Direct-seeding failed in sticky grey clays in a ‘hole’ in the 2014 restoration area. The change in soil type couldn’t be clearer!
But seedlings of the striking Red Moort Eucalyptus vesiculosa planted into it later couldn’t be happier, and the area will develop as a gorgeous Red Moort woodland.
A windstorm put paid to a few hectares of direct-seeding in the 2013 restoration area. But with help from a donor interested in Carnaby’s Cockatoos, we’ve turned that to advantage, direct-seeding and planting a rich mix of proteaceous species.<br/>The tall Banksia sessilis at left – ‘Parrot Bush’ – is a particular favourite. A windstorm put paid to a few hectares of direct-seeding in the 2013 restoration area. But with help from a donor interested in Carnaby’s Cockatoos, we’ve turned that to advantage, direct-seeding and planting a rich mix of proteaceous species.
The tall Banksia sessilis at left – ‘Parrot Bush’ – is a particular favourite.
The restoration design is informed by ecologist Angela Sanders’ analysis of the requirements of a range of fauna for shelter, breeding and forage habitat.  <br/> The restoration design is informed by ecologist Angela Sanders’ analysis of the requirements of a range of fauna for shelter, breeding and forage habitat.
The orange- or yellow-flowered chittick Lambertia inermis flowers reliably all year round.  Seed is difficult to collect, but the amount of bird activity always around chittick attests to its value in the restoration. <br/> The orange- or yellow-flowered chittick Lambertia inermis flowers reliably all year round. Seed is difficult to collect, but the amount of bird activity always around chittick attests to its value in the restoration.

Sometimes we're so busy getting the job done that we forget to take time out to record the results. Colleagues in Melbourne had asked me for updated images of the restoration work so that we can show our wonderful donors what we do with what they give us. So I took time out yesterday to capture some updated images of the Monjebup North project.

Spring's always a great time to be out and about, but I was even more excited than usual by our partners Bill and Jane Thompson's news the day before that they'd stumbled across a brand new Malleefowl nest in the middle of the 2012 restoration area.  

Malleefowl nesting in our recovering landscape - another significant milestone!

<br/>New malleefowl nest currently under construction in the 2012 restoration area at Monjebup North.
New malleefowl nest currently under construction in the 2012 restoration area at Monjebup North.
Shot taken a year after the 2014 direct-seeding.<br/> Shot taken a year after the 2014 direct-seeding.
<br/>The same shot taken yesterday, showing development three years after direct-seeding.
The same shot taken yesterday, showing development three years after direct-seeding.
Restored vegetation in the 2012 area, in a system with significant component of Allocasuarina/she-oak.  Acacias are dropping out, and a hand-planted ‘proteaceous node’ of white-flowered Hakea nitida in the background is well established.<br/> Restored vegetation in the 2012 area, in a system with significant component of Allocasuarina/she-oak. Acacias are dropping out, and a hand-planted ‘proteaceous node’ of white-flowered Hakea nitida in the background is well established.
Hakea nitida, like most of the Hakeas, produces so much nectar that its aroma hangs heavy in the air on warm spring afternoons.<br/> Hakea nitida, like most of the Hakeas, produces so much nectar that its aroma hangs heavy in the air on warm spring afternoons.
Acacias still doing their job in the 2013 restoration area.  As well as the ‘proteaceous nodes’ hand-planted here, some proteaceous species including Hakea corymbosa were included in the direct-seeding and are well represented in this system.<br/> Acacias still doing their job in the 2013 restoration area. As well as the ‘proteaceous nodes’ hand-planted here, some proteaceous species including Hakea corymbosa were included in the direct-seeding and are well represented in this system.
As well as producing copious quantities of nectar, the seriously spiky Hakea corymbosa makes for ideal predator-proofed nesting sites for Tawny-Crowned Honeyeaters and other small birds.<br/> As well as producing copious quantities of nectar, the seriously spiky Hakea corymbosa makes for ideal predator-proofed nesting sites for Tawny-Crowned Honeyeaters and other small birds.
Developing habitat in the 2013 restoration area.  What self-respecting Honey Possum, Emu Wren or Malleefowl wouldn’t want to live here?<br/> Developing habitat in the 2013 restoration area. What self-respecting Honey Possum, Emu Wren or Malleefowl wouldn’t want to live here?
It’ll be interesting to see what fauna turns up the next time our pitfall trapping sites are run.<br/> It’ll be interesting to see what fauna turns up the next time our pitfall trapping sites are run.
If at first you don’t succeed, try again. Direct-seeding failed in sticky grey clays in a ‘hole’ in the 2014 restoration area. The change in soil type couldn’t be clearer!<br/>But seedlings of the striking Red Moort Eucalyptus vesiculosa planted into it later couldn’t be happier, and the area will develop as a gorgeous Red Moort woodland. If at first you don’t succeed, try again. Direct-seeding failed in sticky grey clays in a ‘hole’ in the 2014 restoration area. The change in soil type couldn’t be clearer!
But seedlings of the striking Red Moort Eucalyptus vesiculosa planted into it later couldn’t be happier, and the area will develop as a gorgeous Red Moort woodland.
A windstorm put paid to a few hectares of direct-seeding in the 2013 restoration area. But with help from a donor interested in Carnaby’s Cockatoos, we’ve turned that to advantage, direct-seeding and planting a rich mix of proteaceous species.<br/>The tall Banksia sessilis at left – ‘Parrot Bush’ – is a particular favourite. A windstorm put paid to a few hectares of direct-seeding in the 2013 restoration area. But with help from a donor interested in Carnaby’s Cockatoos, we’ve turned that to advantage, direct-seeding and planting a rich mix of proteaceous species.
The tall Banksia sessilis at left – ‘Parrot Bush’ – is a particular favourite.
The restoration design is informed by ecologist Angela Sanders’ analysis of the requirements of a range of fauna for shelter, breeding and forage habitat.  <br/> The restoration design is informed by ecologist Angela Sanders’ analysis of the requirements of a range of fauna for shelter, breeding and forage habitat.
The orange- or yellow-flowered chittick Lambertia inermis flowers reliably all year round.  Seed is difficult to collect, but the amount of bird activity always around chittick attests to its value in the restoration. <br/> The orange- or yellow-flowered chittick Lambertia inermis flowers reliably all year round. Seed is difficult to collect, but the amount of bird activity always around chittick attests to its value in the restoration.
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