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Birdbath antics at Goonderoo

Leanne Hales (Volunteer Coordinator North)
Published 15 Aug 2018 by Leanne Hales (Volunteer Coordinator North)

When I ask our volunteer caretakers about the highlights of their posting at Goonderoo Reserve, almost everyone mentions the birdbath.

The fuss and flurry around that one little water bowl is the source of much entertainment and enjoyment for those that visit this charming reserve in the Central Queensland brigalow belt.

Recent caretaker, Margaret Alcorn snapped some fantastic photos and provided this amusing commentary of the birdbath afternoon antics: 

Of all the birds who visit the birdbath at Goonderoo the Spotted Bowerbirds are the bossiest, the rudest and enjoy their bath the most. 

They will hiss at any other birds that try to share and even mimic a Whistling Kite's call if that doesn't scare the offenders off.

However, they can be overwhelmed by a crowd. And lots of birds wait until they are busy elsewhere before enjoying a drink.

Every day in July, after our jobs were done, we cleaned out the birdbath and filled it up with fresh water and then sat back to see what turned up.

What a treat, when a few minutes later the birds would appear as if from nowhere and the fun would begin.

During their stay, Richard and Margaret completed Birdlife surveys at 13 locations on the reserve, as well as weed mapping; pre-feeding, fence and water checks at the Avocet Nailtail nursery; they also presented to visiting University of Queensland students and they also fixed the dunny! 

Not a bad way to spend a month?

Spotted bowerbird displaying a fine pink crest Spotted bowerbird displaying a fine pink crest
Spotted bowerbird enjoying bathtime Spotted bowerbird enjoying bathtime
and time for a shake.... and time for a shake....
An Olive-backed Oriole being hissed at by the bossy bowerbird An Olive-backed Oriole being hissed at by the bossy bowerbird
Safety in numbers- the Apostlebirds move in Safety in numbers- the Apostlebirds move in
Double-barred finches take a sneaky sip Double-barred finches take a sneaky sip
Noisy friarbird Noisy friarbird
Pale-headed rosella Pale-headed rosella
Striped honeyeater Striped honeyeater
White-throated honeyeaters White-throated honeyeaters
Spotted bowerbird displaying a fine pink crest Spotted bowerbird displaying a fine pink crest
Spotted bowerbird enjoying bathtime Spotted bowerbird enjoying bathtime
and time for a shake.... and time for a shake....
An Olive-backed Oriole being hissed at by the bossy bowerbird An Olive-backed Oriole being hissed at by the bossy bowerbird
Safety in numbers- the Apostlebirds move in Safety in numbers- the Apostlebirds move in
Double-barred finches take a sneaky sip Double-barred finches take a sneaky sip
Noisy friarbird Noisy friarbird
Pale-headed rosella Pale-headed rosella
Striped honeyeater Striped honeyeater
White-throated honeyeaters White-throated honeyeaters

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