The next generation

Kurt Tschirner
Published 15 Apr 2019 
about  Boolcoomatta Reserve  
Pittosporum angustifolium (Native Apricot).<br/> Pittosporum angustifolium (Native Apricot).
Einadia nutans  (Climbing Saltbush). Photo Kurt Tschirner.<br/> Einadia nutans (Climbing Saltbush). Photo Kurt Tschirner.
Santalum lanceolatum (Plum Bush). Photo Kurt Tschirner.<br/>
Santalum lanceolatum (Plum Bush). Photo Kurt Tschirner.
Maireana brevifolia (Small-leaf Bluebush) fruit is being produced in huge quantities in the Oonartra flood-out. Photo Kurt Tschirner.<br/> Maireana brevifolia (Small-leaf Bluebush) fruit is being produced in huge quantities in the Oonartra flood-out. Photo Kurt Tschirner.
Myoporum fruit recently eaten and subsequently dispersed by an Emu. Photo Kurt Tschirner.<br/> Myoporum fruit recently eaten and subsequently dispersed by an Emu. Photo Kurt Tschirner.
Senecio sp seeds. Photo Kurt Tschirner.<br/> Senecio sp seeds. Photo Kurt Tschirner.
Acacia victoriae (Prickly Wattle). This relatively short-lived species is regarded as a coloniser and produces large amounts of seed. Photo Kurt Tschirner.<br/> Acacia victoriae (Prickly Wattle). This relatively short-lived species is regarded as a coloniser and produces large amounts of seed. Photo Kurt Tschirner.

Boolcoomatta Station Reserve (in South Australia) had a very dry year in 2018 with only 89 mm rainfall recorded (half of that fell in the heat of November and disappeared very quickly).

For 2019, only 7mm had fallen up until the middle of March  so it has been a tough time for flora and fauna alike.

However, hope springs eternal and some species of plants ignored the rain gauge and went ahead with flowering and seeding in preparation for more favourable conditions.

This will be part of the next generation, and they were rewarded in late March with 28mm of gentle soaking rainfall.

Einadia nutans  (Climbing Saltbush). Photo Kurt Tschirner.<br/> Einadia nutans (Climbing Saltbush). Photo Kurt Tschirner.
Santalum lanceolatum (Plum Bush). Photo Kurt Tschirner.<br/>
Santalum lanceolatum (Plum Bush). Photo Kurt Tschirner.
Maireana brevifolia (Small-leaf Bluebush) fruit is being produced in huge quantities in the Oonartra flood-out. Photo Kurt Tschirner.<br/> Maireana brevifolia (Small-leaf Bluebush) fruit is being produced in huge quantities in the Oonartra flood-out. Photo Kurt Tschirner.
Myoporum fruit recently eaten and subsequently dispersed by an Emu. Photo Kurt Tschirner.<br/> Myoporum fruit recently eaten and subsequently dispersed by an Emu. Photo Kurt Tschirner.
Senecio sp seeds. Photo Kurt Tschirner.<br/> Senecio sp seeds. Photo Kurt Tschirner.
Acacia victoriae (Prickly Wattle). This relatively short-lived species is regarded as a coloniser and produces large amounts of seed. Photo Kurt Tschirner.<br/> Acacia victoriae (Prickly Wattle). This relatively short-lived species is regarded as a coloniser and produces large amounts of seed. Photo Kurt Tschirner.