Conservationists of the future!

Sarah Luxton
Published 19 Jun 2019 
by Sarah Luxton 
about  Monjebup Reserves  
Angela Sanders at the Bush Heritage STEM Expo stand.<br/> Angela Sanders at the Bush Heritage STEM Expo stand.
Albany STEM Expo 2019<br/> Albany STEM Expo 2019
An endangered Red Tail Phascogale nesting box<br/> An endangered Red Tail Phascogale nesting box
Information cards for students - about some of the native fauna that Bush Heritage protects.<br/> Information cards for students - about some of the native fauna that Bush Heritage protects.
Our South West Ecologist Angela Sanders<br/> Our South West Ecologist Angela Sanders
Seeds and information about the Fitz-Stirling restoration program.<br/> Seeds and information about the Fitz-Stirling restoration program.
Snake skins for the students to handle and ID<br/> Snake skins for the students to handle and ID
Students really enjoyed using the thermal imager (below) to look at their class-mates, and see how a camera trap works.<br/> Students really enjoyed using the thermal imager (below) to look at their class-mates, and see how a camera trap works.

Recently our Fitz-Stirling Ecologist Angela Sanders and several of our trusty volunteers met with 13-15-year-old students at the 2019 Science Rocks Expo in Albany, to talk all things ecology and environmental careers.

With 600 young people attending over two days it was a fun, interactive and engaging way to share a bit about Bush Heritage’s work in south-west WA and life as an ecologist on the front lines of nature conservation.

From thermal images, camera traps and how to identify a Malleefowl and its mound, to monitoring the endangered Red-tailed Phascogale – students learnt about some of their unique local species and how we can look after them.

Chrissy, one of our volunteers, said “The students were really interested in what we were doing, especially in the thermal imager and using a telescopic probe to investigate an old tree hollow that had spider webs and a Tarantula inside” (do not fear, not a real one). 

She also said that the snake skins with their different patterns were a big hit, and that students were interested in how Bush Heritage has restored areas of farmland and fascinated by how much it could change in 6 years.

The expo definitely widened their perspectives and sparked interest in the environment as a possible career.

A big thank you to our volunteers Renae, Chrissy and Meredith that helped answer 100s of questions and dedicated their time, passion and expertise to sharing the importance of our environmental heritage with a future generation of environmental scientists and ecologists.

Albany STEM Expo 2019<br/> Albany STEM Expo 2019
An endangered Red Tail Phascogale nesting box<br/> An endangered Red Tail Phascogale nesting box
Information cards for students - about some of the native fauna that Bush Heritage protects.<br/> Information cards for students - about some of the native fauna that Bush Heritage protects.
Our South West Ecologist Angela Sanders<br/> Our South West Ecologist Angela Sanders
Seeds and information about the Fitz-Stirling restoration program.<br/> Seeds and information about the Fitz-Stirling restoration program.
Snake skins for the students to handle and ID<br/> Snake skins for the students to handle and ID
Students really enjoyed using the thermal imager (below) to look at their class-mates, and see how a camera trap works.<br/> Students really enjoyed using the thermal imager (below) to look at their class-mates, and see how a camera trap works.