Cravens Peak Reserve receives a welcome reprieve from extreme heat and dust storms

Published 09 Jan 2015 
about  Cravens Peak Reserve  
Watching the showers of rain in the distance<br/>Saturday 3 Jan 2015. Photo by Linda Welldon Watching the showers of rain in the distance
Saturday 3 Jan 2015. Photo by Linda Welldon
Coolibah Waterhole<br/> Photo by Linda Welldon Coolibah Waterhole
Photo by Linda Welldon
<br/>Sunday 4 Jan 2015. Photo by Peter Welldon
Sunday 4 Jan 2015. Photo by Peter Welldon
Coolibah Waterhole<br/> Photo by Linda Welldon Coolibah Waterhole
Photo by Linda Welldon
<br/>Sunday 4 Jan 2015. Photo by Peter Welldon
Sunday 4 Jan 2015. Photo by Peter Welldon
Coolibah Waterhole<br/> Photo by Linda Welldon Coolibah Waterhole
Photo by Linda Welldon
<br/>Tuesday 6 Jan 2015. Photo by Linda Welldon
Tuesday 6 Jan 2015. Photo by Linda Welldon
Lignum Swamp<br/> Photo by Linda Welldon Lignum Swamp
Photo by Linda Welldon
<br/>Tuesday 6 Jan 2015. Photo by Peter Welldon
Tuesday 6 Jan 2015. Photo by Peter Welldon
Lignum Swamp<br/> Photo by Linda Welldon Lignum Swamp
Photo by Linda Welldon
Lignum Swamp<br/> Photo by Linda Welldon Lignum Swamp
Photo by Linda Welldon
Black-tailed Native Hens at Lignum Swamp<br/> Photo by Linda Welldon Black-tailed Native Hens at Lignum Swamp
Photo by Linda Welldon
Black-tailed Native Hens grazing on dune beside Lignum Swamp<br/> Photo by Linda Welldon Black-tailed Native Hens grazing on dune beside Lignum Swamp
Photo by Linda Welldon

Cravens Peak Reserve has had a weather change in the past few days. On Sunday 4 January 2015 we were woken to the sound of rain on the roof - music to our ears! Over a period of three hours, we recorded a fall of 47mm.

We've lived on Cravens Peak for just over three years and have never experienced this much continuous rain. Over six days, we've recorded 66mm of rain.

This will transform to the landscape's vegetation. We look forward to enjoying a colourful wildflower season.   

Rainfall on the reserve has been minimal over the past couple of years. This rain is especially exciting for us because it has fallen in fire-scarred areas where there has been either minimal or no rain since the fires of 2011 and early 2012.

Because of the rain, Coolibah Waterhole is full. This is the highest water level that we have seen since coming to live and work at Cravens Peak Reserve some three years ago.

Lignum swamp, which runs from the Homestead to Coolibah Waterhole has has water. The bird life is ariving to enjoy this change in the landscape too – a new swimming hole.

Watching the showers of rain in the distance<br/>Saturday 3 Jan 2015. Photo by Linda Welldon Watching the showers of rain in the distance
Saturday 3 Jan 2015. Photo by Linda Welldon
Coolibah Waterhole<br/> Photo by Linda Welldon Coolibah Waterhole
Photo by Linda Welldon
<br/>Sunday 4 Jan 2015. Photo by Peter Welldon
Sunday 4 Jan 2015. Photo by Peter Welldon
Coolibah Waterhole<br/> Photo by Linda Welldon Coolibah Waterhole
Photo by Linda Welldon
<br/>Sunday 4 Jan 2015. Photo by Peter Welldon
Sunday 4 Jan 2015. Photo by Peter Welldon
Coolibah Waterhole<br/> Photo by Linda Welldon Coolibah Waterhole
Photo by Linda Welldon
<br/>Tuesday 6 Jan 2015. Photo by Linda Welldon
Tuesday 6 Jan 2015. Photo by Linda Welldon
Lignum Swamp<br/> Photo by Linda Welldon Lignum Swamp
Photo by Linda Welldon
<br/>Tuesday 6 Jan 2015. Photo by Peter Welldon
Tuesday 6 Jan 2015. Photo by Peter Welldon
Lignum Swamp<br/> Photo by Linda Welldon Lignum Swamp
Photo by Linda Welldon
Lignum Swamp<br/> Photo by Linda Welldon Lignum Swamp
Photo by Linda Welldon
Black-tailed Native Hens at Lignum Swamp<br/> Photo by Linda Welldon Black-tailed Native Hens at Lignum Swamp
Photo by Linda Welldon
Black-tailed Native Hens grazing on dune beside Lignum Swamp<br/> Photo by Linda Welldon Black-tailed Native Hens grazing on dune beside Lignum Swamp
Photo by Linda Welldon