Fungi & citizen science in the Liffey Valley

Published 28 May 2016 
about  Liffey River  
chanterelles<br/>  By Tim Brown chanterelles
By Tim Brown
You dont need to go far before you're stopping again when looking at fungi in Tasmania. <br/>  By Tim Brown You dont need to go far before you're stopping again when looking at fungi in Tasmania.
By Tim Brown
Dr Sapphire McMullan-Fisher explains<br/>  By Tim Brown Dr Sapphire McMullan-Fisher explains
By Tim Brown
A page from a member of the publics fungi notes from their property in northern Tasmania<br/>  By Tim Brown A page from a member of the publics fungi notes from their property in northern Tasmania
By Tim Brown
jelly fungus<br/>  By Tim Brown jelly fungus
By Tim Brown
mycena interrupta<br/>  By Tim Brown mycena interrupta
By Tim Brown
purple jelly fungus<br/>  By Tim Brown purple jelly fungus
By Tim Brown
scarlet bracket fungus<br/>  By Tim Brown scarlet bracket fungus
By Tim Brown
scleroderma after releasing spores<br/>  By Tim Brown scleroderma after releasing spores
By Tim Brown
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tubaria rufofulva<br/> By Tim Brown tubaria rufofulva
By Tim Brown
antrodiella zonata<br/>  By Tim Brown antrodiella zonata
By Tim Brown
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marasmius angina<br/>  By Tim Brown marasmius angina
By Tim Brown
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Just how little we know about fungi. Only half of known fungi have scientific names, we’re discovering new species all the time and still have lots to learn about the distribution of common species.

With the ever increasing effects of climate change, it’s important to get baseline data on fungi while we can.

There’s not enough time or enough mycologists for them to get it all done alone, so ‘citizen scientists’ have a very important role to play in helping to collect this data.

Maybe one day we’ll be able to identify fungi hot spots for targeted conservation, but for now we have reserves Liffey River in the fungi-rich wet Tasmanian forests.

With help from NRM North and Fungi map we were able to host a fungi field day on our Liffey River Reserve on the 18th May 2016. Fungi map brought experienced mycologists Dr Tom May and Dr Sapphire McMullan-Fisher to walk, kneel, record and talk with a group of interested public – young and old.

Many had been photographing, collecting and drawing fungi and sending in their information to Fungi map.

For more information on how you can get involved in your neck of the woods go to Fungimap.org.au, or if you’d like to stroll around the Liffey River Reserve circuit while the fungi is busy – come anytime.

You dont need to go far before you're stopping again when looking at fungi in Tasmania. <br/>  By Tim Brown You dont need to go far before you're stopping again when looking at fungi in Tasmania.
By Tim Brown
Dr Sapphire McMullan-Fisher explains<br/>  By Tim Brown Dr Sapphire McMullan-Fisher explains
By Tim Brown
A page from a member of the publics fungi notes from their property in northern Tasmania<br/>  By Tim Brown A page from a member of the publics fungi notes from their property in northern Tasmania
By Tim Brown
jelly fungus<br/>  By Tim Brown jelly fungus
By Tim Brown
mycena interrupta<br/>  By Tim Brown mycena interrupta
By Tim Brown
purple jelly fungus<br/>  By Tim Brown purple jelly fungus
By Tim Brown
scarlet bracket fungus<br/>  By Tim Brown scarlet bracket fungus
By Tim Brown
scleroderma after releasing spores<br/>  By Tim Brown scleroderma after releasing spores
By Tim Brown
<br/>
tubaria rufofulva<br/> By Tim Brown tubaria rufofulva
By Tim Brown
antrodiella zonata<br/>  By Tim Brown antrodiella zonata
By Tim Brown
<br/>
marasmius angina<br/>  By Tim Brown marasmius angina
By Tim Brown
<br/>