Gondwana link in one easy lesson

Published 18 Sep 2014 
about  Monjebup Reserves  
Simon Smale and Sarah Martin inspect newly emerging native seedling at a site recently sown with native seeds.<br/>Bush Heritage is revegetating areas that will link remnants of intact bushland providing corridors that enable wildlife to travel between them.\nPhoto by Peter Martin Simon Smale and Sarah Martin inspect newly emerging native seedling at a site recently sown with native seeds.
Bush Heritage is revegetating areas that will link remnants of intact bushland providing corridors that enable wildlife to travel between them.\nPhoto by Peter Martin
Sarah and Simon among native shrubs in a recently replanted paddock.<br/>  Photo by Peter Martin Sarah and Simon among native shrubs in a recently replanted paddock.
Photo by Peter Martin
Simon is justifiably proud of the success of his revegetaion efforts. <br/>  Photo by Peter Martin Simon is justifiably proud of the success of his revegetaion efforts.
Photo by Peter Martin

As we came through the Western Australian wheat belt and salt damaged land around Hyden, and then through the densely forested Stirling Ranges we began to realise the significance of the Gondwana Link project to the southwest region of Western Australia.

With rising salinity through extensive land clearing for agriculture, revegetation to retain the rich biodiversity of the region is an absolute priority, it would seem.

We were blown away by the extent and diversity of the planting program that Bush Heritage has already undertaken on its five properties that comprise a portion of the middle section of the bigger project, and that is working to link the Fitzgerald River National Park to the Stirling Ranges.

With 12 years experience of sourcing appropriate seed for soil type and planting methods refined, some of the acreages are beginning to look like the adjoining natural vegetation, and Bush Heritage's Gondwana Link project manager Simon Smale admitted to a quiet satisfaction as we surveyed the work that he, ecologist Angela Sanders and others have achieved since Bush Heritage joined the partnership and took the first step. As he put it, 'there's only so much talking you can do, you've just got to get on to doing it!'

Meeting Keith Bradby, CEO of Gondwana Link, gave us further insights into this exciting project, and we came away understanding and appreciating the ambition and vision of those involved here.

Simon Smale and Sarah Martin inspect newly emerging native seedling at a site recently sown with native seeds.<br/>Bush Heritage is revegetating areas that will link remnants of intact bushland providing corridors that enable wildlife to travel between them.\nPhoto by Peter Martin Simon Smale and Sarah Martin inspect newly emerging native seedling at a site recently sown with native seeds.
Bush Heritage is revegetating areas that will link remnants of intact bushland providing corridors that enable wildlife to travel between them.\nPhoto by Peter Martin
Sarah and Simon among native shrubs in a recently replanted paddock.<br/>  Photo by Peter Martin Sarah and Simon among native shrubs in a recently replanted paddock.
Photo by Peter Martin
Simon is justifiably proud of the success of his revegetaion efforts. <br/>  Photo by Peter Martin Simon is justifiably proud of the success of his revegetaion efforts.
Photo by Peter Martin