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Great Southern cat cull

Published 18 Feb 2021 by Emma Young, reporter at WA Today

Joining the WA state government and farmers to fight ferals

Read the full story on the WA Today website 

Bush Heritage has begun work with the West Australian government’s fox baiting program in the south and will target cats and rabbits too.

The Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions manages the Fitzgerald River and Stirling Range national parks. Bush Heritage Australia owns and manages 5000 hectares in the Fitz-Stirling region including the Monjebup, Beringa and Chereninup Creek Reserves. Cats and foxes are a key threat.

Domestic and feral cats are the same species and have an instinct to catch live prey, which is having a devastating impact on native species such as small marsupials and reptiles, the Western Pygmy and Honey Possums, Dunnarts and possibly the Red-tailed Phascogale. These are not adapted to cope with such a predator.

The government has been baiting over a long period in the areas it manages, but this program increases the baiting area five-fold and is unique in targeting cats, rabbits and foxes at once.

The project will take place over five years, 40,000 hectares and enlist 17 local farmers. 

Full story on the WA Today website 

This work is possible due to the major support of Lotterywest
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Honey Possum — one of many species preyed on by cats and foxes. Photo by Will Marwick Honey Possum — one of many species preyed on by cats and foxes. Photo by Will Marwick
Black-gloved Wallaby caught on camera trap Black-gloved Wallaby caught on camera trap
A feral cat snapped by a motion sensing camera trap. A network of traps is monitoring both native species and ferals in the region. A feral cat snapped by a motion sensing camera trap. A network of traps is monitoring both native species and ferals in the region.
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