A fond farewell from Hamelin

Denise Ivers
Published 04 Oct 2019 
about  Hamelin Station Reserve  
Mini Ritchi tree at sunset.<br/> Mini Ritchi tree at sunset.
CEO Heather Campbell with Issy and James.<br/> CEO Heather Campbell with Issy and James.
Group of Red-tailed Black Cockatoos.<br/> Group of Red-tailed Black Cockatoos.
Science Fair talks in the old Shearing Shed.<br/> Science Fair talks in the old Shearing Shed.
Stromatolites at sunset.<br/> Stromatolites at sunset.
Another beautiful sunset at the Station Stay.<br/> Another beautiful sunset at the Station Stay.
A walk and talk tour with Ken and Michelle.<br/> A walk and talk tour with Ken and Michelle.
Welcome Swallows saying goodbye.<br/> Welcome Swallows saying goodbye.
A White-winged Fairy Wren.<br/> A White-winged Fairy Wren.

As we near the end of the visiting season at Hamelin Outback Station Stay I am sad to say that I am writing my last blog. For the past four seasons David and I have lived and worked here at Hamelin Reserve, and during that time we've met many wonderful people and made lots of new friends. While we've been here David has captured great images on his camera, and many have been featured on the blogs I've written.

Many people attended the annual science fair held in August and the old shearing shed was once again used for presentations by the guest speakers. Camping was quite popular with some visitors, who after listening to the presentations could relax and enjoy sitting around the campfire after the sun went down.

Guests visiting Hamelin Outback Station Stay have been able to learn more about Bush Heritage Australia when they go on one of the walk and talk tours. These weekly tours are conducted by Reserve Managers Ken and Michelle Judd, where visitors go on a short walk around the precinct and the beautiful old Homestead, which is built out of shell blocks that were sourced from the nearby shell quarry at Hamelin Pool. Ken and Michelle are able to give an insight into what Bush Heritage is doing on Hamelin and what they hope to achieve on the property.

Our CEO Heather Campbell made her first visit to Hamelin this year with her children Issy and James. It was a pleasure to meet them and it gave them the opportunity to see the uniqueness of Hamelin Outback Station Stay. As at the time of posting this blog we've had 5191 visitors, many of whom didn’t know about Bush Heritage Australia and now have a better understanding of this wonderful organisation, and how they can help protect our precious land.

Many smaller birds have been busy this year building nests for their families in the rafters of the buildings, particularly the Welcome Swallows. Most of them have now left the security of their nest and learnt to fly, but often come back for a visit. For the first time since we've been here we've been privileged to see a flock of about 20 beautiful Red-Tailed Black Cockatoos, who've made their home on some of the large trees near the shearing shed. You can tell when they are coming in to nest when you can hear their distinct birdsong.

Sunsets are always beautiful here and I have included some with my favourite Mini Ritchi tree and also with the sun setting over the Stromatolites, which are just down the road from us. 

I hope you have enjoyed reading all about Hamelin Outback Station Stay. If you haven’t visited yet, put it on your bucket list – I'm sure you will love it as much as we do.

Cheers from Denise and David.

(All photos by David Hulks.)

CEO Heather Campbell with Issy and James.<br/> CEO Heather Campbell with Issy and James.
Group of Red-tailed Black Cockatoos.<br/> Group of Red-tailed Black Cockatoos.
Science Fair talks in the old Shearing Shed.<br/> Science Fair talks in the old Shearing Shed.
Stromatolites at sunset.<br/> Stromatolites at sunset.
Another beautiful sunset at the Station Stay.<br/> Another beautiful sunset at the Station Stay.
A walk and talk tour with Ken and Michelle.<br/> A walk and talk tour with Ken and Michelle.
Welcome Swallows saying goodbye.<br/> Welcome Swallows saying goodbye.
A White-winged Fairy Wren.<br/> A White-winged Fairy Wren.