Mass flowering of Desert Bloodwoods

Published 30 Oct 2017 
about  Cravens Peak Reserve  
Pied-Honeyeater<br/> Pied-Honeyeater
Black Honeyeater<br/> Black Honeyeater
White-browed Woodswallow.<br/> White-browed Woodswallow.

Just after I arrived at Cravens Peak in July, I noticed the heavy budding of the Desert Bloodwoods (Corymbia opaca),  which occur in random strings scattered through the gidgee woodlands and dune swales.

While the Grey-headed Honeyeater and the Singing Honeyeater are residents at Cravens Peak, the Black Honeyeaters and Pied Honeyeaters arrived in numbers shortly after the first trees bloomed. As the number of blossoms swelled and flowering reached a peak, hundreds, if not thousands of woodswallows arrived in chattering swarms early in the morning to feast on the rich blossoms.

Honeyeaters and chats became overwhelmed and displaced from their feeding positions. The mass feeding flocks comprised White-browed, Masked and Black-faced Woodswallows.

Black Honeyeater<br/> Black Honeyeater
White-browed Woodswallow.<br/> White-browed Woodswallow.