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Our vision to 2030

Heather Campbell (CEO)
Published 14 Dec 2021 
by Heather Campbell and Sue O’Connor 
about   

Harvesting bluegrass seeds at Carnarvon Station Reserve, Bidjara country, Qld. Photo by Krystle Wright.<br/> Harvesting bluegrass seeds at Carnarvon Station Reserve, Bidjara country, Qld. Photo by Krystle Wright.
Our priority landscapes - where we focus our work - have been updated with an overlay of expected climate change impacts. See our 2030 strategy for more details.<br/> Our priority landscapes - where we focus our work - have been updated with an overlay of expected climate change impacts. See our 2030 strategy for more details.
Bush Heritage ecologist Matt Appleby working with Valerie Le Maitre on her farm in the Tasmanian Midlands. Photo Amelia Caddy.<br/> Bush Heritage ecologist Matt Appleby working with Valerie Le Maitre on her farm in the Tasmanian Midlands. Photo Amelia Caddy.
Ecologist Allana Brown with Olkola Aboriginal Corporation Chair Mike Ross. Photo by Brian Cassey.<br/> Ecologist Allana Brown with Olkola Aboriginal Corporation Chair Mike Ross. Photo by Brian Cassey.

It is time for real action that delivers impact and a clear pathway to deliver healthy Country, protected forever for the benefit of people, culture and biodiversity. That’s why today we’re proud to announce that we intend to deepen and double our impact to more than 30 million hectares of land by 2030.

These goals are based on science and driven by the insights and experience we've gained over the past 30 years. They're the most ambitious targets we’ve ever set but we know them to be achievable.

Our 2030 Strategy sets out a clear pathway to return the bush to good health. It is ambitious because there's much work to be done.

An ecological domino effect is taking place – with the triple threat of climate change, invasive species and land clearing. We feel it in our summers laced with ash, and peculiarly warm winters; in the flash floods and the crackling dry; in the towns with no water and the cities begging for green spaces. We feel it in the silence of our forests.

That’s why we plan to expand our land acquisition program to grow our reserve network to more than 2.4 million ha by 2030 to protect our irreplaceable landscapes.

We will explore with our current and new Aboriginal Partners how we might deepen and expand our relationships to achieve conservation outcomes on their land. Our relationships with Traditional Owners have always been paramount to our success and we are privileged to work beside them and learn from their strong and enduring connection to Country.

We will work with farmers to further improve conservation on agricultural land, to protect our native species and deliver biodiverse carbon management. This area, an emerging focus for us, will see Bush Heritage have conservation impact across more than 10 million ha of farming land by 2030.

With the support of our committed donors and partners, we know we can do this. We can deepen our operational capacity and strengthen our land management, grow our partnerships and buy more land.

Over the past three decades, we have shown time and time again that we have the expertise and partnership capabilities to make these strategic aims a reality.

So, as we step boldly towards 2030, we ask you to consider a future where native species are protected and ecosystems are healthy. Thriving landscapes are a choice we make together; so please join the Bush Heritage community and help us return the bush to good health.

Our priority landscapes - where we focus our work - have been updated with an overlay of expected climate change impacts. See our 2030 strategy for more details.<br/> Our priority landscapes - where we focus our work - have been updated with an overlay of expected climate change impacts. See our 2030 strategy for more details.
Bush Heritage ecologist Matt Appleby working with Valerie Le Maitre on her farm in the Tasmanian Midlands. Photo Amelia Caddy.<br/> Bush Heritage ecologist Matt Appleby working with Valerie Le Maitre on her farm in the Tasmanian Midlands. Photo Amelia Caddy.
Ecologist Allana Brown with Olkola Aboriginal Corporation Chair Mike Ross. Photo by Brian Cassey.<br/> Ecologist Allana Brown with Olkola Aboriginal Corporation Chair Mike Ross. Photo by Brian Cassey.