Red-finned Blue-eye making a splash at Edgbaston!

Published 18 Apr 2018 
by Pippa Kern 
about  Edgbaston Reserve  
Rod Fensham getting muddy renovating the new artificial springs.<br/> Rod Fensham getting muddy renovating the new artificial springs.
An artificial spring. New habitat created for the Red-finned Blue-eye.<br/> An artificial spring. New habitat created for the Red-finned Blue-eye.
Getting ready to release the first red-finned blue-eye into their new home. Steve Baines (ANGFA), Pippa Kern (BHA) and Peter Johnson (ANGFA).<br/> Getting ready to release the first red-finned blue-eye into their new home. Steve Baines (ANGFA), Pippa Kern (BHA) and Peter Johnson (ANGFA).
The Red-finned Blue-eye adjusting to their new habitat.<br/> The Red-finned Blue-eye adjusting to their new habitat.
Happy fish. The Red-finned Blue-eye exploring their new home.<br/> Happy fish. The Red-finned Blue-eye exploring their new home.

Out at Edgbaston Reserve we've been busy getting our artificial springs up and running in preparation for the introduction of our favourite fish – the critically endangered Red-finned Blue-eye.

This has involved plumbing our new bore to three artificial springs, introducing artesian spring vegetation and invertebrates to create wetlands that replicate the natural habitat of the Red-finned Blue-eyes, and generally getting pretty muddy.

With the help of some great volunteers from the Australian and New Guinea Fish Association (ANGFA) we were able to add the finishing touches and complete the planting of the springs. Then it was the big moment! We collected fish from each of our translocated populations, transported them carefully to the artificial springs… and splash!

With a gentle introduction to their new home, the first red-finned blue-eyes were off and swimming. We've been keeping an eye on these precious fish, and they're happily exploring their new home. Over the coming weeks we'll introduce fish into the other two artificial springs.

These captive populations will play a key role in our conservation effort to save the Red-finned Blue-eye. In the artificial springs we'll establish three populations, and with successful reproduction in these populations we'll be able to use fish from these springs to translocate back to the wild.

This is a very exciting step in the continuing conservation effort of this species!

This project has been supported by the Queensland Government’s Everyone’s Environment Grant program.

Rod Fensham getting muddy renovating the new artificial springs.<br/> Rod Fensham getting muddy renovating the new artificial springs.
An artificial spring. New habitat created for the Red-finned Blue-eye.<br/> An artificial spring. New habitat created for the Red-finned Blue-eye.
Getting ready to release the first red-finned blue-eye into their new home. Steve Baines (ANGFA), Pippa Kern (BHA) and Peter Johnson (ANGFA).<br/> Getting ready to release the first red-finned blue-eye into their new home. Steve Baines (ANGFA), Pippa Kern (BHA) and Peter Johnson (ANGFA).
The Red-finned Blue-eye adjusting to their new habitat.<br/> The Red-finned Blue-eye adjusting to their new habitat.
Happy fish. The Red-finned Blue-eye exploring their new home.<br/> Happy fish. The Red-finned Blue-eye exploring their new home.