Red-tailed Phascogales a translocation success

Published 22 May 2018 
about  Kojonup Reserve  
Volunteers Kimberley and Janine check a nest box<br/> Volunteers Kimberley and Janine check a nest box
Red-tailed Phascagale<br/> Red-tailed Phascagale
Colourful nesting material<br/> Colourful nesting material
Ecologist Angela Sanders explains data collection to the Kojonup High School Students <br/> Ecologist Angela Sanders explains data collection to the Kojonup High School Students

The annual monitoring of Red-tailed Phascogales at our Kojonup Reserve has just been completed with some good news for the species.

A total of 13 animals were found, 5 females and 8 males, and they were all weighed and measured and found to be in good health. An extra survey was carried out this year to see if they had moved out of the Kojonup Reserve and into neighbouring bushland. A total of 100 traps were set in adjacent reserves and two males were captured over the 4-night survey. One of the animals climbed quickly into a hollow in large, dead wandoo tree after he was released.

The artificial nest boxes were once again being used extensively and a large assortment of nesting material was found including brightly coloured parrot feathers, wool, she-oak needles, lichen, paperbark, eucalypt leaves and old Banksia flowers.

The boxes were also being used by caterpillars and spiders.

It's now 8 years since the first translocated animals were released on the reserve and we can say that it's been a big success!

Red-tailed Phascagale<br/> Red-tailed Phascagale
Colourful nesting material<br/> Colourful nesting material
Ecologist Angela Sanders explains data collection to the Kojonup High School Students <br/> Ecologist Angela Sanders explains data collection to the Kojonup High School Students