Reflections as we close for summer

Published 28 Oct 2018 
about  Hamelin Station Reserve  
An old wheel at the lake. Photo David Hulks.<br/> An old wheel at the lake. Photo David Hulks.
Welcome swallows. Photo David Hulks.<br/> Welcome swallows. Photo David Hulks.
A Black-fronted Dotterel. Photo David Hulks.<br/> A Black-fronted Dotterel. Photo David Hulks.
Black-winged Stilt. Photo David Hulks.<br/> Black-winged Stilt. Photo David Hulks.
Chiming Wedgebill singing. Photo David Hulks.<br/> Chiming Wedgebill singing. Photo David Hulks.
An Echidna crossing the road. Photo David Hulks.<br/> An Echidna crossing the road. Photo David Hulks.
An Emu drinking. Photo David Hulks.<br/> An Emu drinking. Photo David Hulks.
A Perentie. Photo David Hulks.<br/> A Perentie. Photo David Hulks.
A Red-backed Kingfisher surveys the surroundings. Photo David Hulks.<br/> A Red-backed Kingfisher surveys the surroundings. Photo David Hulks.
Red-capped Robin. Photo David Hulks.<br/> Red-capped Robin. Photo David Hulks.
The Stromatolite boardwalk. Photo David Hulks.<br/> The Stromatolite boardwalk. Photo David Hulks.
Ancient Stromatolites. Photo David Hulks.<br/> Ancient Stromatolites. Photo David Hulks.

This is my last blog for 2018. Each year Hamelin Outback Station Stay closes over the summer months, so we'll be reopening again in March next year.

We've seen quite a few changes in the wildlife and the landscape this year, from dry barren red ground to fields covered in a variety of wildflower colours. 

Quite a few different species of birds have visited us. In fact, most mornings we've been lucky enough to wake to the sounds of the Chiming Wedgebill and the Butcher Bird, trying to see who can sing the loudest. Kangaroos and Emus have also been spotted late in the afternoon as they come in for a drink at the lake. 

Of course, one of the biggest wildlife attractions are actually the rock-like Stromatolites of Hamelin Pool. These living structures are similar to the first life on earth, and have existed on our planet for millions of years. You can see them for yourself – just 4.5km from our station stay is the most extensive living Stromatolite system in the world. They're accessible to view from a boardwalk erected over the crystal clear water of Hamelin Pool. You can either drive or take a walk to the Stromatolites, and on the way you may even spot an Echidna crossing the road.

Many guests have visited Hamelin Outback Station Stay this year – we've had an incredible 6,083 people stay with us. Each time a visitor checks in we ask them a few questions to learn about who our visitors are. Here are some of the top results:

Where are you from?

Australian visitors – Western Australia, Victoria and New South Wales
International visitors – Germany, France and England

How did you hear about us?

  1. Word of Mouth from other travellers
  2. Return visitors
  3. The Wiki Camps app  
I hope you enjoy these photos that capture just some of the sights we've enjoyed in the past year. I will finish with a big thank you to all the guests that have visited Hamelin Outback Station Stay and hope to see many of you return again in the future.
Welcome swallows. Photo David Hulks.<br/> Welcome swallows. Photo David Hulks.
A Black-fronted Dotterel. Photo David Hulks.<br/> A Black-fronted Dotterel. Photo David Hulks.
Black-winged Stilt. Photo David Hulks.<br/> Black-winged Stilt. Photo David Hulks.
Chiming Wedgebill singing. Photo David Hulks.<br/> Chiming Wedgebill singing. Photo David Hulks.
An Echidna crossing the road. Photo David Hulks.<br/> An Echidna crossing the road. Photo David Hulks.
An Emu drinking. Photo David Hulks.<br/> An Emu drinking. Photo David Hulks.
A Perentie. Photo David Hulks.<br/> A Perentie. Photo David Hulks.
A Red-backed Kingfisher surveys the surroundings. Photo David Hulks.<br/> A Red-backed Kingfisher surveys the surroundings. Photo David Hulks.
Red-capped Robin. Photo David Hulks.<br/> Red-capped Robin. Photo David Hulks.
The Stromatolite boardwalk. Photo David Hulks.<br/> The Stromatolite boardwalk. Photo David Hulks.
Ancient Stromatolites. Photo David Hulks.<br/> Ancient Stromatolites. Photo David Hulks.