Spring Volunteer working bees

on 19 Nov 2014 
Overhanging branches trimmed from the Eurardy front entrance were placed out to trap sediment and prevent erosion along the Bungabandi Creek (a practice called 'brushing').

Volunteer working bees are a great way for people to experience Bush Heritage reserves and work alongside other like-minded folks to help achieve conservation outcomes.

This spring many of our reserves have engaged volunteers to help with key projects during the seasonal peak in activity. Volunteers contribute across the broad spectrum of our activities including:

  • weed control,
  • annual vegetation and bird surveys,
  • rabbit warren patrols,
  • infrastructure maintenance,
  • sand pad monitoring,
  • erosion control and
  • even tour-guiding at the recent Charles Darwin Reserve Open Day event.

Working in teams means that the big challenges become far less daunting. The old adage of 'many hands make light work' rings absolutely true as teams of volunteers tackle projects like weed control at Nardoo Hills and Scottsdale reserves with impressive results.

Here are some photos from the spring working bee at Eurardy Reserve in Western Australia. Reserve Manager, Ian Hamilton was full of praise when I caught up with him on the phone the following week. "We've had the best volunteer operations that anyone could hope for", regaled Ian. "We got through my list of jobs plus many more that weren't on the list! They were a great bunch of people, with a good mix of skills and plenty of enthusiasm to go with it".

Overhanging branches trimmed from the Eurardy front entrance were placed out to trap sediment and prevent erosion along the Bungabandi Creek (a practice called 'brushing').