The first new-style gambusia exclusion fence

Published 20 Jun 2016 
about  Edgbaston Reserve  
Big smiles reflect the sense of achievement in finishing 150 metres of gambusia exclusion fencing at Edgbaston Reserve. It took 75 person hours from start to finish. <br/>From left to right: Matt Young, Peter Unmack, David (Cujo) Coulton, Kathy Wager, Margi Sweeney and Peter Negus. Photo Rob Wager. Big smiles reflect the sense of achievement in finishing 150 metres of gambusia exclusion fencing at Edgbaston Reserve. It took 75 person hours from start to finish.
From left to right: Matt Young, Peter Unmack, David (Cujo) Coulton, Kathy Wager, Margi Sweeney and Peter Negus. Photo Rob Wager.
The new-style fence around a valuable Red-fin Blue-eye population is finished. The old style fence in the background will be carefully removed over time to minimise any disruption to the spring ecosystem. <br/>Photo Rob Wager. The new-style fence around a valuable Red-fin Blue-eye population is finished. The old style fence in the background will be carefully removed over time to minimise any disruption to the spring ecosystem.
Photo Rob Wager.
It was hard work attaching the Gambusia excluding material to the wires but the deep trench in which to bury the material was the most arduous part of building the fence.<br/>Photo Rob Wager. It was hard work attaching the Gambusia excluding material to the wires but the deep trench in which to bury the material was the most arduous part of building the fence.
Photo Rob Wager.

The Red-fin Blue-eye and Edgbaston Goby are endangered fish found only in a few artesian springs on Edgbaston Reserve in central Queensland. They're threatened by the invasive Gambusia fish

To protect the blue-eyes and gobies, in May 2016 five volunteers helped Bush Heritage contractor David (Cujo) Coulton and myself to install the first of many new-style Gambusia exclusion fences.

These fences are designed to stop the Gambusia swimming overland during flooding and invading springs in which blue-eyes and gobies live. The new style fence is an evolution of older fence styles and was designed to be stronger and more durable, hopefully lasting longer than ten years.

Nick Nichols and his team at Pro-Knit Industries in Brisbane manufactured the special gambusia excluding material for Bush Heritage Australia. We hope you like the colours!

Volunteer Kathy Wager said, “This is great, but I hope I can help remove it within 10 years because someone has developed a more effective way of dealing with the Gambusia menace.” Everyone agreed. 

- Rob Wager (Bush Heritage freshwater ecologist)

Our work to protect the Red-fin Blue-eye is supported by the Queensland Government’s Everyone’s Environment grants program.

Logo: Everyone's Environment Grants
The new-style fence around a valuable Red-fin Blue-eye population is finished. The old style fence in the background will be carefully removed over time to minimise any disruption to the spring ecosystem. <br/>Photo Rob Wager. The new-style fence around a valuable Red-fin Blue-eye population is finished. The old style fence in the background will be carefully removed over time to minimise any disruption to the spring ecosystem.
Photo Rob Wager.
It was hard work attaching the Gambusia excluding material to the wires but the deep trench in which to bury the material was the most arduous part of building the fence.<br/>Photo Rob Wager. It was hard work attaching the Gambusia excluding material to the wires but the deep trench in which to bury the material was the most arduous part of building the fence.
Photo Rob Wager.