University of Qld students are reserve-bound

Published 19 Mar 2016 
about  Naree Station Yourka Reserve Carnarvon Reserve Edgbaston Reserve  
Cody and Rob Wager were all smiles as students rushed to put their names down for the 2016 trips.<br/> Cody and Rob Wager were all smiles as students rushed to put their names down for the 2016 trips.
Renee Rossini (PhD student), Cody-Ellen Murray (Research Assistant) and Bush Heritage Ecologist Murray Haseler at a planning session late last year.<br/> Renee Rossini (PhD student), Cody-Ellen Murray (Research Assistant) and Bush Heritage Ecologist Murray Haseler at a planning session late last year.
The iROOS head back to Edgbaston next weekend.<br/> The iROOS head back to Edgbaston next weekend.
Murray answering questions about our management approach.<br/> Murray answering questions about our management approach.
iROOS manning the rooftop BBQ.<br/> iROOS manning the rooftop BBQ.

Bush Heritage is pleased to announce that the UQ iROOS are $250 closer to their latest target thanks to a successful fundraising BBQ on the rooftop of the biological sciences building on campus last Friday afternoon. The iROOS are raising money to help fund four field trips to Bush Heritage reserves, starting with Edgbaston in the Easter break.

Thanks to thought-provoking presentations by Murray Haseler and Rob Wager at their annual recruitment event earlier in the day, the students are also fired up for some field work.

This year Bush Heritage is offering group volunteer placements at Edgbaston, Naree, Carnarvon and Yourka Reserves, which will involve the students in monitoring activities as well as Natural Resource Management projects such as weed control and boundary fencing.

It’s a rare opportunity for the students to gain some practical skills and some real-world insight.

The rooftop fundraiser was also the perfect opportunity to catch up with Heads of school, Sue Lowrey and Professor Gimme Walter, who expressed their overwhelming gratitude that we'd creating these opportunities for the undergrads of environmental and biological sciences.

We’re pretty happy with this collaboration too - who knows where it may lead? Perhaps to future research partners, future employees or future ambassadors for Bush Heritage and conservation. And in the meantime we’ll be getting some help with work on our reserves – a win-win I reckon.

In other parts of the country we have similar connections with educational institutions. Bush Heritage reserves are providing opportunities for future conservationists to experience new ecosystems, learn and practice skills and work alongside our ecologists and reserve managers.

It’s sometimes hard to measure the value of these activities but we know that the outputs go well beyond some dead weeds or a section of exclusion fence. While it’s great to see students contributing tangible outcomes on our reserves it's even greater to be inspiring young Aussies to dedicate careers and lives to protecting biodiversity – paying it forward for the planet.

Cody and Rob Wager were all smiles as students rushed to put their names down for the 2016 trips.<br/> Cody and Rob Wager were all smiles as students rushed to put their names down for the 2016 trips.
Renee Rossini (PhD student), Cody-Ellen Murray (Research Assistant) and Bush Heritage Ecologist Murray Haseler at a planning session late last year.<br/> Renee Rossini (PhD student), Cody-Ellen Murray (Research Assistant) and Bush Heritage Ecologist Murray Haseler at a planning session late last year.
The iROOS head back to Edgbaston next weekend.<br/> The iROOS head back to Edgbaston next weekend.
Murray answering questions about our management approach.<br/> Murray answering questions about our management approach.
iROOS manning the rooftop BBQ.<br/> iROOS manning the rooftop BBQ.