Our challenges

The bush needs to be managed for the long term: achieving real change can take decades and there are many significant challenges ahead.

Ecologist Ben Parkhurst checks a reptile trap during a biological survey. Photo Annette Ruzicka.
Ecologist Ben Parkhurst checks a reptile trap during a biological survey. Photo Annette Ruzicka.

We're proud to be one of only a handful of conservation organisations using strategic indicators to measure, monitor and report on our conservation impact. This means we can make informed decisions about our management practices, and change them if necessary.

It also means our supporters can see the real change that their generous donations have made possible.

Wildfire is an ongoing threat to bushland throughout much of Australia. Photo Ross Bray.
Wildfire is an ongoing threat to bushland throughout much of Australia. Photo Ross Bray.

Landscape-scale conservation management’ means we're focused on returning entire landscapes to good health, rather than just isolated or fenced patches of forest or grassland. This approach acknowledges that ecosystems are complex and interconnected, with no single element operating alone.

Our long-term, landscape-scale approach ensures that the species we're protecting are more resilient to change – such as drought, wildfires or climate change – because they have more space in which to find shelter, food, water and mates.

Below are just some of the challenging changes our natural environment is facing.